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Sharon White
from Drush

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Hello, everyoneSharon White
00:00 / 00:18

Drush


small, worthless fragments; fine rain


The titles of the poems are taken from Shetland Words: A dictionary of the Shetland dialect. Alastair and Adaline Christie-Johnson

 


 

 

 

Jappi


Even if you thought it was

true, it wasn’t

was it?

 

cliffs scarred with

lichen, ice blue

lips of the bay

 

even wanting it to be true

won’t do it

will it?

 

just wave your hand for me

 

 

 

Yarmer


Once again the dishwasher 

is empty

the knives and forks alone

 

once again a man coughs

another laughs

the dog with the brown and white face

 

barks

all for naught

the tethered minutes rain down

 

constant, gentle, silver

 

 

 

Yarta


To swim in

and out

as in love

 

away, the whole

river empty

this morning

 

even though 

bushes blaze

and the mockingbird

 

tries all his tricks

 

 

 

Irp


Were you gone

by the time I got 

there?

 

A sip of death

in the shower

there was nothing

 

they could do

the pinch of each

minute and then the long

 

corridor

 

 

 

Anunder


Thee to whom it

may concern—famish

furnish asunder

 

the gale winds

snow slope

escarpment

 

even if you don’t

want to it might

give you celebration

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

 

jappi  — a hen (a cheeping jabbering creature).

yarmer  — a cat.

yarta  — properly, the heart, now a term of endearment; child of my heart.

irp  — to complain incessantly; to harp on.

anunder  — under.

 

Sharon White

Sharon White’s book Vanished Gardens: Finding Nature in Philadelphia won the AWP award in creative nonfiction. Boiling Lake (On Voyage), a collection of very short fiction, is her most recent work. She is also the author of two collections of poetry, Eve & Her Apple and Bone House. Her memoir, Field Notes, A Geography of Mourning, received the Julia Ward Howe Prize, Honorable Mention, from the Boston Authors Club. New work appears in The Rupture, DIAGRAM, Cloudbank, and Nowhere magazine where her essay, “Sightings,” was a finalist in the Fall Travel writing contest.